Lisa Silver is a native Calgarian, lawyer, educator, and avid community volunteer. She has a B.A. in Economics (UWO, 1984), an LL.B. (Osgoode Hall, 1987), and a LL.M. (Calgary, 2001). She was called to the Bar of Ontario in 1989 and the Bar of Alberta in 1998. From 1987 to 1998, she practiced with the firm of Greenspan, Humphrey where she specialized in criminal appeals. She has appeared before all levels of Court, including the Supreme Court of Canada. From 1999 to 2000, she was a presiding Justice of the Peace. In 2001, she was awarded a Masters of Law on the basis of her Thesis entitled “The Punitive Sanction as an Alternative to the Criminal Sanction in Regulatory Offences.”

Presently, she is in private practice and does legal research and writing in the areas of criminal law. She is particularly interested in the objective/subjective mens rea doctrinal debate, the criminalization of regulatory behavior, and the intersection of law and media. She was a part-time faculty member at Mount Royal University in the Department of Justice Studies from 2002 to 2013 where she taught courses on human rights, criminal law, and criminal procedure and evidence. In September of 2014, she will be teaching first-year law students criminal law at the University of Calgary, Faculty of Law.

Her paper entitled “Poof Into A Puff of Air - Where Have All The Defences Gone? The Air of Reality Test And The Defences of Justifications and Excuses” has been accepted for publication in the Criminal Law Quarterly. In 2012, Ideablawg was a runner-up for a CLawbie (Canadian Law Blog Award). 

About The Photo

The image used as Ideablawg's banner is a photograph of Osgoode Hall in Toronto. Osgoode Hall as a long and storied legal history and presently houses the The Court of Appeal for Ontario, the Superior Court of Justice and the Law Society of Upper Canada. I spent many an hour in Osgoode's hallowed halls including in its outstanding dining hall - love those butter tarts! Osgoode Hall is architecturally significant and its facade, depicted here, is true to the 1860 design. The inside is as fascinating: Convication Hall with its legally significant many-faceted stained glass windows and the Great Library with its colonnades and bas reliefs. A big thank you to Josh Silver for taking and sending the photo.