In Praise of the Passionate Lawyer

Recently, Rex Murphy eloquently reminded us of the lawyer’s role in the justice system. He did this in support of Marie Henein's CBC interview. An interview she did not give to defend the profession but to remind us of how it works. To remind us, as Rex Murphy stresses, of the core values lawyers protect and engage in: liberty, fairness, and justice through the lens of the presumption of innocence. Some of these values may seem trite or overdrawn but they are not. They are at the very heart of our society as they define who we are and who we are not. For lawyers, who practice in this milieu, these values underscore and frame everything we do. Admittedly, these values, or objectives, are difficult to attain.  Clarence Darrow, who epitomizes these values, once said: “Justice has nothing to do with what goes on in a courtroom; Justice is what comes out of a courtroom.” Thus, these values can be elusive, can be difficult to attain, and can question your belief in them. Perhaps this is why we cherish them even more.

There is one comment made by Rex Murphy I do question. He describes the lawyer’s role as dispassionate. This is not so. To be dispassionate suggests an observer’s role or even an impartial one. Lawyers are not observers: lawyers are in it and they are in it zealously. Perhaps he means lawyers cannot get lost in the emotional content of the case for fear of losing their perspective. It is this perspective, as a person learned in the law, which is of utmost assistance to the client. Nevertheless, lawyers are in the business of passion: Whether it is around us as part of the case or whether we passionately advocate for our client. It is this passion, which connects us, as lawyers and as members of society, to those core values we hold so dear. Passion and compassion is our stock and trade – and so I praise it.