Episode 48 of the Ideablawg Podcasts on the Criminal Code of Canada: Inciting Mutiny Under Section 53

Mutiny is a familiar subject. It is familiar in a narrative sense: take Mutiny on the Bounty for instance and the well-known story of an uprising against the cruel authority of Captain Bligh. Yet the story is not fictitious. Pitcairn Islands which harboured First Officer Fletcher Christian and the “mutinous” soldiers of the Bounty, is still populated by the descendants of the mutineers and remains a remnant of British colonialism. In that story, we tend to sympathize with the mutinous survivors who are depicted as justified in their actions. The story and the sympathies find repetition in the classic 1950s Henry Fonda/James Cagney movie, Mister Roberts.  Again, the concept of struggling against unjust authority appears to be the theme. Yet, the actual Criminal Code offence of mutiny does not contain these built-in sympathies. In fact, although we rarely consider mutiny as a modern circumstance, it is a serious offence in our Criminal Code. Today, in the 48th episode of the Ideablawg podcasts on the Criminal Code, we will explore the offence of inciting mutiny.

 

Mutiny or inciting to mutiny as the offence is framed in section 53 is an English common law offence found in our first 1892 Criminal Code. It is one of the prohibited acts against the public order along with other offences such as alarming the Queen under s. 49. It is an offence whose purpose is to sanction treasonous or mutinous actions involving seduction or inciting of Canadian military personnel to act against the interests of the state. It reads as follows:

 

 53 Every one who

 

         (a) attempts, for a traitorous or mutinous purpose, to seduce a member of the Canadian Forces from his duty and allegiance to Her Majesty, or

         (b) attempts to incite or to induce a member of the Canadian Forces to commit a traitorous or mutinous act,

 

is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding fourteen years.

 

Originally, until 1952-53 Code amendments, this offence was punishable by life imprisonment and therefore considered as serious as treason and murder. In fact, the offence remains a s. 469 offence, and, therefore, must be tried in Superior Court.

 

It should be noted that this is an offence of attempting to seduce, incite or induce as opposed to the actual completion of the contemplated action.  The complete offences would fulfill the elements of the full offence of treason under s. 46 or even sedition under s. 63. Indeed, the original wording of the offence, as found in the 1892 Code, requires the offender to “endeavor” to seduce, incite or “stir up.” According to the Oxford Dictionary online, “endeavor” means “an attempt to achieve a goal.” The use of the term “endeavor” is consistent with the ulterior purpose required for the mens rea element of this section, which is to effect the prohibited conduct for “a traitorous or mutinous purpose.” Applying the 1995 SCC Hibbert case to the use of the word “purpose,” the Crown would need to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the accused acted with a high level of subjective mens rea.

 

Returning to the actus reus components of the section, the term “mutinous” or “mutiny” is not defined in the Criminal Code. “Mutiny” is defined under the National Defence Act as “collective insubordination or a combination of two or more persons in the resistance of lawful authority in any of Her Majesty’s Forces or in any forces cooperating therewith.” This definition reiterates the fact this crime is not unlike a counselling or conspiracy offence under the Code. It also requires “collective” behaviour involving more than one individual. The term “insubordination” has a peculiar meaning as reflected by the sections 83 to 87 of the National Defence Act. These insubordination offences cover a broad range of behaviour such as using threatening or insulting language to a superior officer under s. 85 or “strikes or uses violence” toward a superior officer. Desertion, however, is not considered an offence of “insubordination” but a separate infraction as is sedition.

 

In the Criminal Code, the term “insubordination” is used in “offences in relation to military forces” under s. 62 of the Code. We will discuss this offence later in this journey through the Criminal Code but in reading s. 62, which makes it an offence to counsel insubordination or mutiny, one wonders what the differences are between the two offences. Section 62 was not in the 1892 Code but was added in 1951 Code amendments. Certainly, section 53 is the broader offence and, as mentioned earlier, punishes an attempt to incite mutiny or treason. However, section 62 punishes the full or complete offence of mutiny, among other prohibited acts such as insubordination, yet the maximum punishment is by a term of imprisonment not exceeding five years. Clearly, section 62, the full offence, is considered a less serious offence than its counterpart s. 53, which punishes an attempt. Considering this, the assumption must be that the s. 53 offence is meant to capture more serious behaviour than just “collective insubordination.” However, in a 2004 court martial decision, Blouin P.S. (Corporal), R. v., 2004 CM 25 (CanLII), the presiding military judge in sentencing Corporal Blouin for a form of insubordination under s. 84 of the National Defence Act involving an assault of a superior officer, described the act as “attacking not merely the individual but the cornerstone of the military institution he or she represents: the chain of command.” The judge then characterized the offence of insubordination as “objectively serious as the offence of treason or mutiny.”

 

Another aspect of the actus reus is the requirement the accused “seduce” under 53(a) or “incite or induce” under 53(b) a member of the Canadian Forces. The concept of seduction is an old one as found in offences of seduction in the 1892 Code, which have now been repealed, such as the offence of seduction of females who are passengers on vessels, or the offence of seduction of girls under sixteen years. Presently, s. 53 is the only section in the Criminal Code referring to seduction. What does “seduce” then mean? The word “seduction” arises from the Latin word “seduco” meaning to draw aside or lead astray. Of course, there was a decidedly gender bias to those original seduction offences and the case law on the interpretation of the word “seduction” reflects that. In the 1927 Saskatchewan Queen’s Bench decision, R v Schemmer, seduction was deemed to be a word connoting a loss of a woman’s virtue imbuing the offence with a moralistic condemnation. By analogy therefore “seduce” as used in s. 53 has an aspect of a “fall from grace” as epitomized by Darth Vader in Star Wars who attempts to “seduce” his son, Luke Skywalker, to the dark side of the force.

 

The Court in the Schemmer decision suggests seduction requires an element of enticement and inducement, which happen to be the prohibited act requirements for the mutiny offence under s. 53(b). “Incite” as defined in the Merriam Webster online dictionary is to “urge on” or “stir up”. As previously mentioned the phrase “stir up” was included in the original 1892 offence. “Induce” is to “move by persuasion or influence” and is related to “seduce” but in the online dictionary “seduce” is to “lead astray by persuasion” or by “false promises,” giving seduction a fraudulent tone. A further definition of “seduce” includes “to persuade to disobedience or disloyalty” which seems to be the conduct underlying s. 53.

 

It should be noted that Canadian Forces is defined under section 2 of the Code as the armed forces “of Her Majesty raised by Canada.”

 

A final aspect of the section 53(a) offence is the requirement that the prohibited act involves an attempt to seduce a member from his or her “duty and allegiance to Her Majesty.” This requires proof that the seduction is directly linked to the member’s duty and allegiance to the sovereign. 

 

Section 53 is presently rarely used and appears to have a “doppelganger” section in the form of section 62. This section should certainly be considered in the revisions of the Code as a section no longer used or needed in our criminal law.

 

 

 

 

Episode 45 of the Ideablawg Podcasts on the Criminal Code of Canada: Section 50 Assisting the Enemy and Failing to Prevent Treason

Section 50 continues our discussion of prohibited acts under the Part relating to offences against the public order. Section 50 contains two separate offences: assisting an enemy of Canada to leave the country without consent of the Crown and knowingly failing to advise a peace officer or a justice of the peace of an imminent act of treason. The full section reads as follows:

50(1) Every one commits an offence who

            (a) incites or wilfully assists a subject of

                        (i) a state that is at war with Canada, or

(ii) a state against whose forces Canadian Forces are engaged in hostilities, whether or not a state of war exists between Canada and the state whose forces they are,

to leave Canada without the consent of the Crown, unless the accused establishes that assistance to the state referred to in subparagraph (i) or the forces of the state referred to in subparagraph (ii), as the case may be, was not intended thereby; or

(b) knowing that a person is about to commit high treason or treason does not, with all reasonable dispatch, inform a justice of the peace or other peace officer thereof or make other reasonable efforts to prevent that person from committing high treason or treason.

These offences are indictable and pursuant to subsection 2 of the section, the maximum punishment is fourteen years incarceration. As is evident from the wording of the section, these offences are closely aligned to treason and treasonable acts. Indeed, the offence of failing to inform on a person about to commit treason is essentially an offence of being an accessory or party to the treason, either before the fact or after. Originally, this section in the 1892 Criminal Code was worded to that effect. The change came in the 1915 amendments, most likely as a result of World War One, when the offence of assisting an “alien enemy” was added immediately after the offence of accessory section. In 1927, the two offences were combined under one section. Finally, in the 1953-54 amendments to the Code, the specific reference to accessory was deleted and the section was re-enacted as it stands today.

Needless to say, I have been unable to find any reported decisions on this section other than a reference to the duty to report under s. 50(1)(b). In the 1990 Dersch case, the BCCA considered the seizure of blood samples in a case of suspected impaired driving where the accused was unconscious when the samples were taken for medical purposes. The issue of confidentiality of medical information was considered with the acknowledgement that such confidentiality was subject to exceptional circumstances such as a statutory duty to report. Section 50(1)(b) was cited as an example of such an exceptional situation.

The mens rea requirements for this section is of interest. It could be argued that both offences under this section require a high level of mens rea. In s. 50(1)(a) the use of the word “wilfully” suggests the requirement for a high level of subjective liability, which does not include recklessness. However, the term “willfully,” does not necessarily denote a high level of subjective mens rea as per the 1979 Ontario Court of Appeal case of Buzzanga and Durocher. The contra-argument would rely on the context of this offence, including its connection to treason and the severe punishment attached to conviction, as support for a high level of mens rea. But, s. 50(1)(a) reverses the onus of proof onto the accused by requiring the defence to “establish” that the assistance rendered was not intended. This reverse onus would certainly be subject to a Charter argument under s. 7 and s. 11(d). The mens rea requirement for s. 50(1)(b) is easier to discern as it requires the accused to have knowledge of the expected treason, which clearly requires proof of a high level of subjective liability by the Crown.

Although this section has been historically underused, considering the rise in alleged acts of terrorism, there is a possibility the section could be used in the future. There could be an argument that members of certain terrorist groups are in fact “at war” with Canada and a further argument that these groups in some ways constitute a “state” for purposes of the section. In fact, some of these groups do identify as such. However, in light of new legislation, both within the Code and through other federal statutes, relating to this area, it is more likely the government will prefer to lay charges under this newer legislation, which provides a broader basis for conviction. Probably the best indication of the viability of this section is whether or not it remains in the Criminal Code, in its present form, after the much anticipated government review of the Criminal Code.

 

Section 25 of the Criminal Code Part II: Episode 31 of the Ideablawg Podcasts on the Criminal Code of Canada

In the previous episode, I introduced section 25 of the Criminal Code as a protective measure for those persons enforcing or administering the law and those persons assisting in such activities. Under subsection (1), the section permits the use of force and justifies it if the authorized person acts on “reasonable grounds” and the authorized person uses no more force than is necessary to affect his purpose. Thus, when an authorized person steps outside this reasonable and necessary protection, the force would be considered excessive. However, this justification is qualified under subsection (3) when the force used is “intended or likely to cause death or grievous bodily harm.”

Although, subsection (3) discusses the scenario when the authorized person is not protected under s. 25, in actuality, the subsection establishes when an authorized person would be justified in using, for the want of a better term, “deadly” force. Such force is justified if the authorized person “believes on reasonable grounds that it is necessary for the self-preservation of the person or the preservation of any one under that person’s protection from death or grievous bodily harm.” However, subsection (3) adds a qualifier to subsection (1), where the force is intended to cause death or grievous bodily harm. In those heightened circumstances not only must the force be reasonable and necessary for the enforcement and administration of the law but it must also be used in the context of a reasonable belief on the part of the authorized person that using such force was necessary to protect himself or others under his protection from death or grievous bodily harm. This qualifier is itself subject to (4) and (5). Thus, under subsection (4) such force is justified where the authorized person is arresting someone in circumstances outlined under the subsection. Further, such force is justified against an inmate who is escaping from the penitentiary if the authorized person believes on reasonable grounds that any of the inmates pose a threat of death or grievous bodily harm and the escape cannot be reasonably prevented by less violent means.

There is a large amount of case law on whether the authorized person falls outside of this section and therefore the force is excessive and not justified. The courts have tended to interpret this section generously and to the benefit of the authorized person using the force. For instance, the court recognizes that in the determination of whether or not the force used was reasonable and necessary, the court must not assess the situation through the “lens of hindsight” but must take into account the immediacy of the decision in light of the heightened emotional and stressful circumstances typically surrounding the event. However, the issue of excessive force is a nebulous one driven by factual considerations. Interestingly, though the court is cautious not to be  “a Monday morning quarterback,” many of these cases involve expert evidence not only on appropriate use of force training but also on the ultimate issue as to whether the force used in the case was in fact excessive. By elevating these cases to almost a scientific interpretation of events, the admonishment not to view the cases through the “lens of hindsight” seems to obscure rather than elucidate. A case-by –case determination, applying the relevant legal principles, seems like a more judicious approach.

I don’t intend to go through the case law on this issue in this blog but I would like to point out how the use of force as authorized under this section has impacted areas both outside of criminal law and in criminal law but in a non-traditional basis. The issue of use of force has greatly impacted tort law and civil litigation against police officer and police services. Some of these cases relate, not just to individual officers but also to the concept of use of force in the tactical decisions made by the police. Thus, in the Alberta Court of Appeal case of Webster v. Wasylyshen from 2007, the court considered whether or not the use of the tactical team in the search of the plaintiffs’ home amounted to excessive force. The Court, in that case, found the use of the team was not an excessive use of force “given the need for public protection in the circumstances known to the police.” Excessive use of force by the police is also an issue, which tangentially finds relevance in certain Charter cases where a violation of Charter rights requires an exclusion of evidence under s. 24(2) as the officers’ excessive use of force shows bad faith on the part of the police resulting in the administration of justice being brought into disrepute. Such an argument was accepted in the dissenting decision of the Supreme Court of Canada 2010 Cornell case.  Further, excessive use of force has been used as a mitigating factor on sentence, where an offender is being sentenced for offences but in which the officers were found to be using excessive force.

Although some form of section 25 has been in the Criminal Code since its inception, the section has continued to be tested by the courts in many differing areas of law. The issues raised under this section will no doubt give rise to further advancements in the test to be used in determining excessive use of force and the circumstances in which the court will make such a finding as the world moves into the digital age and the image finds prominence in the courtroom setting. Instead of “dueling” use of force experts the courts will be faced with “dueling” videotapes emanating from citizen cell phones and officers body worn cameras. These new evidentiary tools will, I suggest, push the evidentiary limits of the law in this area and will, I suspect, provide a whole new area of case law in this area.